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A couple of thoughts.

Did you reset the fuel pump using the throttle pedal method when you changed the scv? If not the new one will not work.

Do you have any fault codes showing? (I assume you have some type of code reader)

The engine is prevented from running on by a throttle flap just before the intake manifold. Is that connected and does it operate when you shut down? ( You will need to take the hose off it to see)

Fuel pump, yes, it could have been assembled incorrectly. However it would never have run properly that being the case. So I think it is highly unlikely that this would be your problem.
 

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1. If you disconnect the cam sensor or MAF the engine runs on a default setting, so will still run.
2. There are many things that can cause smoking. Dirty MAF, dirty air filter, worn boost control solenoid and dirty injectors are by far and away the most common. Something a faulty egr system too. Turbo failures are rare, but can cause it. I've not often heard of a failed fuel pump, they seem reliable.
3. 10 to 15 year old Navaras are often smokey, as are many diesels. Mostly for the reasons above. Actually the Navara is very sensitive to a dirty fuel filter, an item very often ignored as part of a service.
4. SCV. In this engine a worn SCV always results in stalling when the engine is worn. If it has worn beyond that you will get a 0089 fault code.
5. Fuel pressure. Assuming you have a code reader you can check the fuel pressure. Fluctuating pressures can be the SCV, poor fuel supply via the filter, worn injectors, a leaking fuel pressure relief valve or a failing fuel pump.
6. This engine does vent the crankcase into the intake pipes, so always there is oil in the intake. That oil is burnt in combustion but not enough to cause smoking. Some people swear by catch cans, not sure they do much apart from keeping the intake clean.

I think from previous threads you sorted the boost control solenoid out (and put the right turbo on) which is the main culprit for serious smoke.

I agree that your problem now could either be the fuel pump or injectors. Getting the injectors cleaned and tested would be my suggestion, especially since you said the engine overheated. (Injectors don't like overheating)
 

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Something I remind myself of, back in say 2004 the average pickup/ute produced around 100bhp/75kw. Great for a landscaper or farmer as he really didn't need to keep up with the traffic and wanted something that would just get from A to B.
The Navara/Pathfinder produced 170bhp/130kw. A massive difference which meant that you could drive it like a car, and so far ahead of the other manufacturers. The trade off- it needs looking after!
 

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Quite commonly the nozzles gum up with carbon deposits, certainly overheating engines can mean they get baked on. The solenoids can sometimes fail which means new or reconditioned injectors.
 

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It might be worth gettingout your scan tool and checking that as many sensors as possible are reading sensibly.


For example, somebody on here once had a coolant temperature sensor showing the wrong temperature, so the engine thought it was cold and fuelled accordingly.
 
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