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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I bought an early (July 2005) D40 Navara Aventura in Morpho blue. I've had it for a few months now, but I'm just using it as a weekend car. I got it from a retired guy who bought it as a demonstration vehicle from the Nissan main dealer. It had 10,800 when I bought it and still has under 12,000 on the clock now. It is a great vehicle - lots of gadgets and is a very striking colour. It came with a "protection pack" fitted by the dealer, which consists of black plastic rubbing strip along the sides and a front plastic cover protecting most of the front bumper. This is the only Navara that I've seen that has had this pack fitted, so it's a little different, it will protect the front bumper from stonechips and the doors from other motorists opening their doors (the Navara is very wide). I bought it as I'm planning to emigrate to South Africa at the end of this year and cars there are very expensive and fairly basic. You don't pay import tax provided you have owned the vehicle for at least 12 months and you don't sell it within 24 months of moving there - otherwise the tax is 25%.

This is the first pick-up I have owned and I probably woudn't have bought one unless I was moving to South Africa.

The good points:
High drivng position means you have a good view ahead
The engine is powerful and yet surprising economical - the computer claims I get 35MPG on a long journey!
The amount of toys are amazing - DVD sat nav, air con AND a sunroof, brilliant sound system, bluetooth phone integration etc
It turns heads

The bad points:
Terrible turning circle - I wouldn't like to take it into most multi-storey car parks!
It's a long vehicle - about 1 foot longer than a standard parking space
Paintwork isn't well finished (by car standards anyway)
Need a step ladder to clean the roof and the hardtop

I'm thinking about installing a reversing camera onto as rear visibility isn't that good (the back windows are tinted and the carryboy top has tinted windows too). The rear cabin window is difficult to clean with the top on too.

I'm thinking about using Diamondbrite sealant to help protect the paintwork - I applied this to my Skoda and it seems to be pretty good. Some dealers offer it as a £250 option, but I bought some on eBay for around £10. I've bought chrome mirror covers, stainless steel handle covers and kick plates. I'm now trying to decide on which alarm system to install to protect the vehicle. I'm also thinking of installing Supaglass to reduce the chances of mugging/hijacking in South Africa.
 

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Welcome to the site :) and what a great introduction :)

I have to agree with your bad points, it is rather long, With a A bar, driving lights and a towbar, its even worse.

Parking is very difficult, its the only draw back, city parking :(
 

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Hi mate welcome to the forum
South Africa? why do you want to live there?
There are a couple of members who live in S.A that pop in accasionally.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
South Africa - why?

You are asking why I want to go to South Africa. Well there are a number of reasons:
1) Better weather (well that isn't hard!)javascript:emoticon('8)')
Cool
2) Cheaper than the UK. The UK has almost 60 million people crammed onto a tiny island. The average house price here is around £160K. The prices have been going up relentlessly for the last 15 years or so. Prices are now beginning to slow down in the UK. The average price of a place in SA is R800K or £65K. I've bought a 1ha (2.5 acres) plot of land in SA - 40 minutes from Cape Town, 20 minutes from the airport and under 2km from the sea (with a sea view). We bought it in the middle of 2006 and it has increased already by around 30-40%! We have done our sums and we reckon we can get 3 houses built (a 4 bed main house and 2 2 bed holiday cottages) on this land for what we sell our place in the UK for. Our place in the UK is tiny - under 1000 square feet. Our plan is to live in the big house (of around 2500 square feet) and rent the other 2 places (around 750 sqft each) out to tourists. The income from the holiday houses should give us enough "pocket money" to live in SA. We will then start a business once we get out there (as it's quite difficult to get a job out there). I'm in telecommunications and there is a chance I'll get some contract work out there in the run-up to the 2010 world cup.
3) South Africa is a beautiful place and there are loads of things to do. House prices are going crazy there and we will hopefully make money by building on the plot we've bought. We've bought in a property hotspot - there is a chance that the smallholdings will be rezoned from agricultural to residential and if this happens we could sub-divide the plot into 4 and sell each one for more than our original purchase price.
4) South Africa will get a high profile during the 2010 world cup and the foreigners coming will want to buy a place there - this should also drive up house prices. That is, of course, assuming that the Government gets its act together and completes the stadiums in time! I believe Australia is the back-up place to host the world cup if things go horribly wrong in SA.
5) We are fed up with the rat race in the UK and want to chill out in SA for a few years. If we can make a living then we'll remain there - if not we'll sell up and consider moving back to the UK or perhaps even New Zealand.
Our biggest problem is SA has a highly volatile currency - the current exchange rate is around R14 per £. If we make 50% profit on property there over the next 3 years this could be wiped out if the rand slips further (if it went to R21 per £). But we are taking a calculated risk and we think that:
1) We can settle in SA and can make enough money to live there
2) IF we don't like it we can still relocate somewhere else because the property prices are still going up fast there.

By the way I'm Scottish but I married a South African. She is an only child and her parents are still living out there. Their main place sits on 0.5 acres and is FIVE TIMES the size of our UK house. They also have a holiday house that is double our house and this sits on a 1.6ha plot. Both of these places together are worth less than our house in the UK - now do you see whay SA is looking attractive? javascript:emoticon(':lol:')
Laughing
 

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What do you do in telecoms?

Im in that line of work too.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Telecoms

Hi Steve,

I'm currently working as a contractor on the BT21CN project at Adastral Park in Martlesham. I contract for Fujitsu (who are doing the copper and fibre MSANS) and I've been working there since August 2005. This is a great project, developing the next generation BT network within tight schedules and using VoIP and packet switched technology rather than continuing to use dedicated circuits. This experience should be useful when I get out to South Africa, as they are are still really backwards when it comes to broadband availabilty. There is still one large telecoms company (called Telkom) that has a monopoly. This means they can charge whatever they like for broadband (and their definition of broadband is anything above 128kb/s!) Telkon charge around £200 to supply an ADSL MODEM and set-up broadband. The monthly fee is then over £50 per month for a 1Mb/s account with a 3GB bandwidth limit (they don't even offer unlimited bandwidth!) I'm hoping that the government will deregulate telecoms and hopefully I will get some contract work with alternative telecoms providers if/when deregulation happens.

Which line of telecoms are you involved with? Where are you working?

Cheers,

Jim
 

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Hi,

I used to work for Nortel Networks on their DMS switching (install of it) for BT, NTL, Telewest, C&W and many more. Then moved on to SDH for Nortel and then got laid off when BT went into debt and contracts were cancelled very quickly!!

Managed to get a start working in partnership with Nokia on the "3" project doing the initial build for Hutchison 3g and then moved backwards to train on GSM kit.

Now working for a scottish company that do work for all the mobile networks but mainly working on the o2 contract doing upgrades and new build for their GSM network.

So, pretty much the opposite of you!

Steve
 

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surprised

interesting new member, aeerpe13
 
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